About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
LINKTV 25
LANGUAGE
English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
rad. movement, or migration both within mexico and north tohe u.s. we explore a major and unexpected source of migras caedw re bskf e usionofaquies can change the rate of flow, or if a new u.s. border policy is having an unintended consequence. ( helicopter whirring ) narrator: every day, thousands of mexicans cross the border illegally into the united states. ofte those hopes are arrested manyre at the border. man: ahora lista pont la mano en frente... narrator: the u.s. i.n.s., or immigration and naturalization service, records each apprehension on standard forms, including one entry with hidden lue: it washe migrants' home towns inexico. that's whabringseograpr chard jones to the i.n. it washe migrants' home towns with a novel reseah plan. jones knows that ecomic conditions vary greatly om region to region in mexico. he suspects that some places drive ou- or "push"-- many more migrants to the u.s. than others. hehis investigation beginses drily90s- or "push"-- aris home inanoniotes. hehis ijones lieves beginses many secrets are stored in i.n.s. files like tse. can theyeveal where
caedollow re weskf e usionof s can change the rate of flow, or if a new u.s. border policy is having an unintendeconsequence. ( helicopter whirring ) narrator: every day, thousands of mexicans cross the border illegally into the united states. often, those hopes are arrested manyre at the border.o man: ahora lista po la mano frente... narrator the u.s. i.n.s., or immigration and naturalization service, records each apprehension on standard forms, including one entrywith hid: it was the migrants' home towns inexico. that's whabringseograpr richard jones to the i.n. with a novel reseah plan. jones knows that economic conditions vary greatly om region to region in mexico. he suspects that some places drive ou- or "push"-- many more migrants to the u.s. than others. hehis investigation beginses driin tly90s "push"-- aris hom in sanoniotes. jones lieves many secrets are stored in i.n.s. files like tse. can they reveal where most migrants come om? can the answers help both countries keep more ople at home? cjones sampless every tenth record, writing down the area of origin within mexico.
they killed was the original shooter. more than 60 soldiers with the u.s.-led note -- into a coalition have been killed this year. meanwhile, 10 afghan civilians died in three separate roadside bomb attacks over the weekend. the dead included a family returning home from the hospital with their newborn baby. more than a dozen afghan witnesses and victims testified over the weekend as part of a hearing to determine whether u.s. staff sergeant robert bales will face court-martial for allegedly slaughtering 16 afghan civilians in march. in video testimony, witnesses, including several children, recalled being shot at and seeing their loved ones murdered. one young one remembered shouting, we are children, we are children, before seeing his sister get shot. president obama addressed a crowd at the arlington national cemetery. >> this is the first veterans day in a decade in which there are no american troops fighting and dying in iraq. [applause] 33,000 of our troops can now return from afghanistan and a transition there is under way. after a decade of war, our heroes are coming home. over the
to an extremely urbanid and mobile population. in the u.s., many urban areas are characterized by diverse cultures, which create a rich ethnic mosaic. oufocus is boston, massachuse, part of a megalopolis located on the northeastern seaboa othe iteds. macaciopulio part of a megalopolis locahave taken root in older seainner-city neighborhoods. in recent decades, these neighborhoods deteriorated, with a downward spiral in infrastructure, services and opportunities. bunow stons bouncing back. with a downward spiral we'll see how relative location to the central business district, or cbd, is important to the development of these neighborhoods-- how so much can ride on their being part of federally-funded enterprise zones and how geographic information systems, or gis, can be used in addressing some difficult urban economic and social issues. boston, massachusetts. once a great port, it's now a world leader in high tech, higher education, bmedicine and finance. but like most u.s. cities, boston lost many jobs and middle-class residents to the suburbs. it's a regional problem-- part of the widening gap b
but i was - actually it was nixon's visit in 1972/73 that opened up in a sense china to the u.s. they saw it as opening china outward to the broader world and it intrigued me and i said this is going to be big and we need more people to know what's going on between our two societies. >> absolutely and as we are - you were here in the first part of the class and of course where we are in beliefs and believers is we're coming to the end of looking at what we call here and we've had a chance to look at them. but, just from your perspective, how close are we in saying tt in confucianism and taoism it cuts to the core of the family? i think susanna raised a question about the priorities but, how so this family relationships? >> family is at the core, family is the principle metaphor for the whole culture. and even in that little take at the very end he said you take it home and cook it for you family, right? so whatever happens the final sort of reference point is the family. that all relationships are based on family relationships; the father/son, the husband/wife, the brother/broth
life-saving treatment for the first time. the u.s. government has joined with some of its biggest foreign rivals in opposing an international moratorium on capital punishment. the u.n. general assembly voted against the death penalty earlier this week by a vote of 110 to 39, with u.s. joined in opposition by countries including iran, north korea, syria, and china. british prosecutors have charged two former top executives at rupert mourdock's news international with bribing public officials for information. rebekah brooks, a former editor and onetime head of news international, is accused of conspiring to pay $160,000 in bribes to a british defense ministry official over a seven- year period. brooks has been a close confidante of mourdock's as well as a friend of british prime minister david cameron. in a separate incident, andy coulson, a former editor who once served as scammers spokesperson, is also facing bribery charges. he and brooks already face criminal charges stemming from the scandal that led to the shutdown of murdoch's news of the world tabloid last year amidst revela
with los angeles in the u.s. and mexico city, are defined by geographers for their enormous size. tountryazil, the mega-city ofaoau has joined the ranks of these world-famousetpolises, a population of 1milliopeople at the startof t 21st century. sao paulo is a city of immigras, at the startof t 21st century. who built it neighborhood by neighborhood. the first immigrants to arrive were portuguese explorers and jesuit missionaries, wlanguage a religio 1554 ans bureal growth did not begin until the 19th ctury. between 1880 and the 1950s, more tn ve million italians came to sao paulo, atacted by jobs in a booming coffee industry. along with these agricultural workers came small business owners and craftsmen who established an italian enclave cled bixiga on the outskirts othe city. , geographer fisco scarlatost nestudies immigration patterns, assimilation anthe expansion of sao paulo. r him,iss t oncamic. he was an artisan anhe. myaterl grandfher came at the beginning ofhe century. narrator e factory is sti inthan ever.y day,bigger l bias sao pau grew around it,ed and rthe neighbor
by the federal government for $10,000. the painting was hung in the u.s. capitol, a triumph for moran. soon after, he began signing his work with the monogram "t.y.m." for thomas "yellowsto" moran. yellowstone remained a source of inspiration throughout moran's career. in 1892, the artist returned to the park to create new paintings of its wonders. by this time, yellowstone was a popular tourist attraction. the idea of the national park, suggested two decades before, had been fully realized. moran's depictions of yellowstone left a permanent mark on the american consciousness, transforming the public perception of the west fr a frightful land of mystery into a patriotic symbol of the beauty and promise of america. ( music )
students choose for example, n.y.u. or columbia as opposed to u.s.c. or u.c.l.a. precisely because there is the illusion of a greater freedom in other words, of personal style as opposed to merely hollywood style. u.c.l.a. and u.s.c., as film schools feed more directly into the hollywood pipeline and a lot of our students want to make the kinds of film, frankly that you people here at this panel make. they're more inspired, i think by jim jarmusch or martin scorsese or jane campion than they are by, well... you know, george lucas or steven spielberg. schrader: my theory is that the reason orson welles scared hollywood to death is because he inserted his personality in the most... elephantine, multi-talented way into cinema and it was just terrifying to see that much personality. the directors who had a style worked in certain channels-- the hitchcock style, the sturges style the ford style, the lubitsch style. there was a way they did it but they were working in the corporate conglomerate way. uh, orson welles was saying, "screw all of this. i'm going to reinvent movies." and, well
/73 that opened up in a sense china to the u.s. they saw it as opening china outward to the broader world and it intrigued me and i said this is going to be big and we need more people to know what's going on between our two societies. >> absolutely and as we are - you were here in the first part of the class and of course where we are in beliefs and believers is we're coming to the end of looking at what we call the ethical dimension which has to do with proper patterns of action looking for the good life and looking towards the social dimension. we've gone through some notes here and we've had a chance to look at them. but, just from your perspective, how close are we in saying that in confucianism and taoism it cuts to the core of the family? i think susanna raised a question about the priorities but, how so this family relationships? >> family is at the core, family is the principle metaphor for the whole culture. and even in that little take at the very end he said you take it home and cook it for you family, right? so whatever happens the final sort of reference point is the family.
a minute, unfortunately. >> u.s. news and world report for july 20th lists you as the most influential muslim leader- black, white, or asian. with that kind of leadership, do you expect louis farrakhan to begin to modify his stance, and if so, in what specific areas? >> well, let me say first that most of farrakhan's people and those that he attracts, they don't believe what the u.s. news and world report says. [laughter] >> hey, take it if you get it, right? >> but i do know that minister farrakhan- now i'll share this with you too. we used to be very good friends- i used to go to his home and he used to play violin; we used to laugh and joke and talk. i enjoyed his family, he enjoyed my family. so when we separated, we lost something, we missed something, and we still miss something- we miss this personal friendship we used to have. so he is really watching every step i make, and believe me, i am influencing what he's doing- in a good way, in a positive way. >> well, maybe he will be, but for now, we've run out of time. i want to thank you so much focoming. >> thank you, mr. simmons.
that patients in the u.s. and europe now receive. but in the last few years, health care advocates and political leaders including n. secretary-gener kofi annan, have begun to campaign for low-priced drugs to treat the infected. the potential benefits are immense. drugs will slow the transmission of the disease. drugs will prevent deaths and help to preserve the labor force. and drugs mean that a generation of children will not grow up as orphans. ( playing upbeat tune ) if the anti-aids campaign in africa succeeds, it could be an inspiration to fighting other diseases that have long denied the people of africa an opportunity to reach their full potential. ( man singing upbeat tune in local language ) ( singing in local language ) narrator: in the developing world, infectious diseases are responsible for almost half of all deaths. the most prevalent: malaria, tuberculosis and hiv/aids. the highest concentration of hiv/aids is in africa, home to 13% of the world's population, but nearly 70% of all aids cases. medical geography provides greater understanding of disease diffusion through space and
the european union and the u.s. gwynne: so it would have a double advantage. it would be easier r resource exports and agro-industrial products, products with value added, to go from chile to the united states and for the united states to respond with increasing sales of machinery and capital goods in the high-technology sectors. so there should be significant advantages for the north american free-trade area to be extended to other countries, and particularly chile. remember, chile is the most free-trading country the whole of soer h vy low tariffs, virtually no non-tariff barriers, so it would be relatively easy for the united states to extend these links. ator chile willontit like mancoies spond states porces oflobalization,xpory. there wichanges and settlement patterns.luds captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org annenberg media ♪ for information about this and other annenberg media programs call 1-800-learner and visit us at www.learner.org.
" was bought by the federal government for $10,000. the painting was hung in the u.s. capitol, a triumph for moran. soon after, he began signing his work with the monogram "t.y.m." for thomas "yellowsto" moran. yellowstone remained a source of inspiration throughout moran's career. in 1892, the artist returned to the park to create new paintings of its wonders. by this time, yellowstone was a popular tourist attraction. the idea of the national park, suggested two decades before, had been fully realized. moran's depictions of yellowstone left a permanent mark on the american consciousness, transforming the public perception of the west fr a frightful land of mystery into a patriotic symbol of the beauty and promise of america. ( music )
key ally, the u.s. army. the army had waited decades to get a new artillery system and believed they deserved crusader. they passed the news to united defense to gear up for a fight. timing oftentimes is everything, and, of course, if you can get your message out first and you can saturate the airwaves and saturate capitol hill with your message, you've got a better chance, obviously, of getting in the first punch. poussaint: the battle to cancel crusader was not the normal partisan fight. instead, it pitted the secretary of defense against key elements in the army establishment. it was a bad decision. rumsfeld, wolfowitz -- patriotic men, dedicated, experienced, and brilliant -- they're wrong on the issue and they're putting the u.s. army's high intensity combat capability at risk. poussaint: that view was shared by the third side of the triangle, key members of congress. 11 billion federal dollars would provide a lot of jobs in the states where crusader was being built. workers in j.c. watts' home district in oklahoma stood to lose jobs. watts: in layman's terms, we call that
somewhere around st. louis was creamed with a major earthquake in the early 1800, yes it can happen in the u.s. >> you are right. what's the name of that fault? >> the new madrid fault, it runs through southern illinois and into missouri. and - there is the possibility >> of course there is a possibility. there is also a possibility that when the millennium comes we are all going to blow up. >> there are more possibilities that there is going to be an earthquake on the new madrid fault, due to geological fact, that's my point. >> this will show you how it can happen. i live in a slab house, concrete one floor. i was in the family room ironing and i was hanging up a shirt and the iron started going like this and i said whatever you kids are doing up there cut it out. i didn't realize - it's a first time i experienced a tremor, and it was right in park forest. so it did happen and it's happened since. >> well speaking of faults i'm at an incredible fault here for not getting to the roll-in on sects and cults. so, but you're right, you're exactly right about the power of media and the history of
. over 1/2 of the u.s. population relies on it for its drinking-water supply. even more groundwater's used for irrigating agriculture, and its industrial use is growing every day. groundwater is valuable because it's plentiful and clean. there's about 50 times more water underground than in all the lakes and rivers on the earth's surface combined. in many areas, especially those with dry climates, groundwater is the most abundant and economical source of water available. because it's filtered as it passes through the soil, groundwater is usually less polluted than surface water. but this valuable resource is now being threatened. in some places, groundwater has been contaminated by industrial or agricultural pollution. in others, wells extract groundwater faster than it can be replenished. already, this has caused severe economic and health problems in several areas of the world. consequently, there's an increasingly important role for the geologists who study water movement underground and who can accurately predict the location and quantity of groundwater. "water, water everywhere
's familiarity networks, "who knows who" within, say, the u.s. and so these are tight networks where effects on one species can propagate to many other species quite quickly. one of the most famous examples of the effects of one species on the others within the ecosystem through the network that we've been studying is the sea otter example. back in the 1800s, the russians and several other western countries paid native americans to hunt sea otters pretty much to the extinction of them in many habitats across the pacific coast. when the otters went extinct, the sea urchins, what the otters ate, started getting really, really abundant. those urchins ended up eating a lot more kelp than usual. and they pretty much destroyed the kelp forests. the whole ecosystem that depended on the kelp was wiped out. so one of the neat sort of network-y things about this system is that if you look at this plant, this lupin, you'll find some ants walking all over it, they sort of patrol it. what happens is many plants in this habitat have nectaries, little places that provide food for the ants. in return, the a
's not my style. so i've been lucky to find financing outside the u.s. "mystery train" was financed 100 percent from japan. it is kind of odd, although i feel m american "mystery train" was financed 100 percent from japan. only kind of coincidentally. hi, goodnight. goodnight. how may i help you? we would like most cheap room please, do you have? all our rooms for two people are the same rates. oh. (speaking japanese) i'sorry, that is too expensive. jarmusch's relationship with hollywood becomes almost more and more irrelevant. with each new picture he makes, hollywood becomes more aware that he's not interested in doing it their way, and that what he's doing is just something else and they don't even have to think about him. hollywood is not very alluring to me. i'm not susceptible to being lured by pools and porsches. i got a '79 chevy. i mean, it's running good. (narrator) joel and ethan coen captured critical acclaim with their debut film, "blood simple," a thriller in the tradition of film noir. i saw "blood simple" right when it came out. and it just was a startling picture. (guns
sitting out here in the cold, or working at a u.s. embassy somewhere in the world in real good shape, but that's the tough question. anyway, let me run through these patterns, and then we'll have plenty of time for some good questions on these. these will all hit home; these will all be very familiar to you- as they should be, because we live this. given that we don't have instinctively this ethical dimension embodies in us that makes us move naturally towards the harmonious, the good, the enduring, we have patterns of obligation that set standards for proper action. so the first one is obligation, and most of us in this room were at one point children. many of us in this room have raised children. many of us in this room are raising children, and that's what you spend a whole lot of your time doing is inculcating in your little fuzzy headed "chillens" obligation towards proper patterns of action- we get it right from the start. a second pattern we have- since we don't measure up ethically- and i hearken back again to that buddhistic idea that we all want to pull apart- selfishness;
's disease is responsible for 50-70% of dementia in the u.s. then stroke is probably responsible for 10-25%. and sometimes it occurs after obvious strokes that patient's language and memory system is immediately compromised by the stroke, and they never recover to their prior cognitive capacity. sometimes people may have lots of little strokes that slowly pick away at the cognitive status, and lead to dementia. it's the leading cause of adult disability in the united states. it is the second leading cause of nursing home placement after alzheimer's disease. dr. hamer: alzheimer's disease is very common. we used to think that people just got dotty as they grew old, but we now understand that there's a specific disease with a specific sort of brain chemistry involved in the formation of tangles and other problems in the neurons of the brain. and we now know that there is, at least in part, a genetic basis for alzheimer's disease. dr. mosqueda: alzheimer's disease is actually a disease of middle age. we just don't really see it becoming apparent until people get older. there's treatment fo
, dogged by the u.s. government, by the fbi? they took back his passport. will kaufman: yeah. he would havei guess it would have been around in the late '40s, when he actually met robeson, because both of them were on the board of people's songs, which was an organization started by pete seeger as a means, again, of energizing the union movement through song. and he admired paul robeson very much. i don't believe he ever sang with them. i saw one letter in which he mentions having met him. but he certainly supported him. and he was there, of course, during thesethe peekskill riots of 1949. amy goodman: well, talk about the peekskill riots. exactly what happened? will kaufman: ok, 1949, august, late august, early september of 1949, the civil rights congress, through people's songs, got paul robeson to agree to sing a benefit concert at the golfing grounds up inor the lakeland picnic area up in peekskill, westchester county. and before robeson even got to the grounds, he neverin fact, he never even made it to the grounds, because for the whole previous week, the peekskill evening star an
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)